FPGAs give robotics exciting possibilities

The information in the above blog highlights the importance of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) in our technological future.

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http://blog.earthtron.com/ten-cutting-edge-projects-that-use-fpga

The information in the above blog highlights the importance of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) in our technological future. I’ve blogged a few times this year on the influence FPGAs have had on the robotics world, but as you can see it is only the tip of the iceberg in the cutting edge of technology today.

The importance of FPGA products is shown in the vast range of applications including artificial intelligence, machine learning, wireless networking, drone advancement as well as my current favorite category — healthcare products. Healthcare is one of the fastest growing markets in the world. I’m particularly impressed how machines are now built to provide various diagnoses that could save patients the time and money of obtaining a second opinion.

LEDs Light Path to Map the Brain

Researchers at the University of Michigan are using mice to determine how neural networks really work.

According to the Earthtron Blog ( http://blog.earthtron.com/tiny-leds-allow-researchers-to-map-the-brain),  researchers placed  light-emitting diodes (LEDs) into mice brains, “allowing researchers to determine how stimuli to one neuron affects other neurons in the area. Each LED is less than a tenth of a millimeter wide, approximately the same size as a neuron.” Continue reading “LEDs Light Path to Map the Brain”

Augmented Reality Glasses to Help the Legally Blind

There is a terrific article in the MIT Technology Review about a prototype for a new device to help the near-blind see and navigate their surroundings. Read it here.

I truly believe that these new wearable electronic glasses that allow people with little sight or who are legally blind to actually see is revolutionizing the industry at amazing speed.

It is a gift from science that these glasses can help legally blind people see people’s faces from up close and afar as well as TV, entertainment, newspapers, books, menus, signs and other reading materials from any distance.  There are a series of these glasses in particular that address all types of vision loss from diabetic retinal disease to ocular and macular degeneration.

I applaud the engineering and development implemented in this revolutionary discovery.